Disability Allowance

Disability Allowance

Disability Living Allowance - sometimes referred to as DLA - is a tax-free benefit for children and adults who need help with personal care or have walking difficulties because they are physically or mentally disabled.The information in this section is a guide only. The office dealing with your claim can answer any questions you may have about claiming and getting Disability Living Allowance.

Who can get Disability Living Allowance?

You may get Disability Living Allowance if:

you have a physical or mental disability, or both
your disability is severe enough for you to need help caring for yourself or you have walking difficulties, or both
you are under 65 when you claim

You can get Disability Living Allowance whether or not you work. It isn't usually affected by any savings or income you may have. If you're aged 65 or over, you may be able to get Attendance Allowance.

Special rules - if you're terminally ill

If you have a progressive disease and are not expected to live for more than another six months there are special rules to help you get the benefit quickly and easily.

Medical examinations

You won't usually need a medical examination when you claim for Disability Living Allowance. But if you're asked to have one you can find out more from the link at the bottom of this page.

How much do you get?

Disability Living Allowance has two parts called 'components': a care component - if you need help looking after yourself or supervision to keep safe a mobility component - if you can't walk or need help getting around Some people will be entitled to get just one component; others may get both. The care component and mobility component are paid at different rates depending on how your disability affects you.

How it's paid?

Disability Living Allowance is normally paid directly into any account of your choice that accepts Direct Payment of benefits. This might be a bank, building society or other account provider. You may be able to get someone else to collect your Disability Living Allowance - for help contact your bank, building society or other account provider. If you'd like more information on how you can be paid in other ways, contact the office dealing with your claim - details are in the 'Rates and how to claim' section.

Effect on other benefits and entitlements

f you start to get Disability Living Allowance it might increase the amount of other benefits you're entitled to, for example: Income Support income-related Employment and Support Allowance Pension Credit Housing Benefit Council Tax Benefit Working Tax Credit Child Tax Credit Disability Living Allowance is ignored as income for working out these income-related benefits and tax credits.

How it's paid?

Disability Living Allowance is normally paid directly into any account of your choice that accepts Direct Payment of benefits. This might be a bank, building society or other account provider. You may be able to get someone else to collect your Disability Living Allowance - for help contact your bank, building society or other account provider.

If you'd like more information on how you can be paid in other ways, contact the office dealing with your claim - details are in the 'Rates and how to claim' section.

Effect on other benefits and entitlements

If you start to get Disability Living Allowance it might increase the amount of other benefits you're entitled to, for example:

Income Support
income-related Employment and Support Allowance
Pension Credit
Housing Benefit
Council Tax Benefit
Working Tax Credit
Child Tax Credit
Disability Living Allowance is ignored as income for working out these income-related benefits and tax credits.

Rates and how to claim

Claim straight away - if you delay you may lose benefit. You can claim online or get a claim pack by:

phoning the Benefit Enquiry Line
contacting your local Jobcentre Plus office or local social security office
downloading the form from the Direct Gov website - please see link at bottom of page.

How it works

Incapacity Benefit is paid at three weekly rates:

short-term (lower) IB is paid for the first 28 weeks
short-term (higher) IB is paid from weeks 29 to 52
long-term IB is paid from week 53
You may be able to get extra benefit - an 'age addition' - with your long-term Incapacity Benefit if you were under 45 when you became too ill or disabled to work. You may be able to get extra benefit for your partner, civil partner or the person who looks after your children.

What else you need to know

To get Disability Living Allowance you must generally be in Great Britain or treated as living here, and meet certain other conditions about your residence and presence. Also, changes to your circumstances can affect the amount of Disability Living Allowance you get or whether you get it. For example, this could be a stay in hospital or if your disability gets worse or better.

For further information click Here to visit the Direct Gov website.